Carbon Emissions and Climate Change

  For a long, long time, it was the one thing on the mind of almost everyone across the country–and the world–almost endlessly. It spawned feature-length documentaries, endless scientific studies and debate after debate. The hole in the ozone was the paramount concern of environmentalists everywhere for years. And now the concern has seemingly disappeared as the hole is headed in a better direction thanks to huge action on the part of nations all over the world. Now, how will action taken to combat climate change affect the Earth?   The so called fracking boom in the United States has slowed as oil prices have dropped. In February of this year, it was reported that the number of natural gas rigs in the US has been dropping steadily for quite some time now. It’s been well-established by studies and backed by President Obama that natural gas has a smaller negative impact on our environment than oil and coal. So when the fracking boom reached its height, murmurs of the US’s energy independence began to grow louder. Talks of the relationship between less foreign dependence and lower carbon emissions have been abound, spurring headlines speaking to the possibility of imminent US energy independence.   But recent studies have indicated that mitigating climate change may not be quite as simple as gaining energy independence from other countries.   The study, published on June 7th from the Universiteit van Amsterdam is titled in fairly conclusive language, “Pursuing energy independence will hardly mitigate climate change.” According to Bob van der Zwaan, who is cited in the study, “This study refutes the idea that...