Economy Woes, Oil Companies Go On Auction Blocks

Right now, the oil industry is enduring on of its weakest prolonged periods in recent memory. With the emergence of fracking and easier, cheaper extraction of natural gases throughout the United States, oil producers have their hands tied with how to handle the situation. With limited access to capital, many producers are being forced to sell assets or, in some cases, sell the business. The number of mergers and acquisitions is up hugely this year, far outpacing what we’ve expected to see in the past, though the bulk of this comes from the purchase of Canadian Oil for over $8...

How Tech is Changing Oil and Gas

No one in their right mind would dare say that technology hasn’t changed the way we’ve lived in recent years. Everything around us, from the homes we live in to the watches on our wrists, have been profoundly affected by technological advances. Even the cars we drive have found themselves with new pieces of tech both inside and out, changing everything from our navigation systems to the fuel efficiency of cars both large and compact. The fuel efficiency of our cars has been rising for years, according to the Washington Post, the cars we drive now are more fuel-efficient than they ever have been previously. Some have reached the point of not needing fuel at all, as electric vehicles have begun to become more and more common on the roads around us. And that could lead to an oil crisis, at least according to Bloomberg. With battery prices dropping seemingly every year, and new scientific advances leading to more advanced battery technology, electric vehicles (EVs) are primed to begin making the transition from high-end luxury purchase to something that just about everyone can afford, regardless of status. “By 2040, long-range electric cars will cost less than $22,000 (in today’s dollars), according to the projections. Thirty-five percent of new cars worldwide will have a plug,” says Bloomberg. Whether or not EVs actually cause the need for oil to drop enough to cause a crisis similar to the one we experience in 2014 is yet to be determined. It will largely depend on how low (or high) prices remain in the next few decades when electric vehicles insert their way into...

What Affects Gas Prices?

According to the Los Angeles Times, there are approximately 253 million cars and trucks motoring down highways, coasting through scenic country roads, and experiencing the frustration of stop and go city traffic across the United States. Recent census data indicates there are about 242 million adults in the United States right now, meaning there are about 1.05 cars per adult in the US. That means, if you’re reading this, there’s a good chance you drive fairly regularly, and a good chance that you, like so many others, monitor gas prices.   Most people seem to keep a fairly cursory watch over world happenings when it comes to things like the price of crude oil. Few people who live outside of the world of economics, government or politics keep close tabs on OPEC or oil reserves and limits. What many do follow, quite stringently in fact, is the price of gasoline around them.   Current prices, just about $2.12 per gallon nationally, is the lowest prices have fallen in inflation-adjusted dollars since about 2002. While state to state prices differ greatly–from about $2.734 per gallon in Hawaii to $1.821 in South Carolina–the national average remains at one of the lowest prices we’ve seen in decades.   So who or what is to blame (or thank, perhaps) for low gas prices around the country? Many people look solely at the price of crude oil per barrel when determining the price of gasoline, though this doesn’t paint an entirely accurate picture. Oil is currently hovering around $42-$45 a barrel, though that’s not the only determiner for the prices of gasoline in America....

Carbon Emissions and Climate Change

  For a long, long time, it was the one thing on the mind of almost everyone across the country–and the world–almost endlessly. It spawned feature-length documentaries, endless scientific studies and debate after debate. The hole in the ozone was the paramount concern of environmentalists everywhere for years. And now the concern has seemingly disappeared as the hole is headed in a better direction thanks to huge action on the part of nations all over the world. Now, how will action taken to combat climate change affect the Earth?   The so called fracking boom in the United States has slowed as oil prices have dropped. In February of this year, it was reported that the number of natural gas rigs in the US has been dropping steadily for quite some time now. It’s been well-established by studies and backed by President Obama that natural gas has a smaller negative impact on our environment than oil and coal. So when the fracking boom reached its height, murmurs of the US’s energy independence began to grow louder. Talks of the relationship between less foreign dependence and lower carbon emissions have been abound, spurring headlines speaking to the possibility of imminent US energy independence.   But recent studies have indicated that mitigating climate change may not be quite as simple as gaining energy independence from other countries.   The study, published on June 7th from the Universiteit van Amsterdam is titled in fairly conclusive language, “Pursuing energy independence will hardly mitigate climate change.” According to Bob van der Zwaan, who is cited in the study, “This study refutes the idea that...

How Fracking is Revolutionizing US Energy

A hot-button subject during presidential debates not only this primary season, but during every US election year in the last few centuries has been our dependance on foreign oil. This is, of course, because of the ever-fluctuating price of oil from Middle-East members of OPEC and our dependance as a nation on oil as an energy source. Now hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” is taking the front seat as a debated subject and a means of self sufficiency for US energy. By 1989, the United State’s dependence on foreign oil was at 47. By 2006, oil imports peaked at 60 percent. Since then, however, the United States has begun to slowly but surely wriggle free from the clutches of its dependance on foreign oil as a means of energy, capped off by President Obama’s pushes to “free ourselves from foreign oil” in 2012. Currently, our dependance on foreign oils continues to drop since its peak in the mid 2000s. Partially to thank for this is fracking. Hydraulic fracturing may be the answer to the United States becoming completely energy self-sufficient in the next few decades. The process is fairly straightforward and has been refined and improved over time, eventually rising to the point of being the most efficient means of collecting natural gas in existence. To start the process, a large drill bores its way into the earth over a natural gas deposit. From there, a pressurized liquid is injected into the rock, fracturing it and allowing the natural gas contained within it to be released. Though the process started with mostly vertical drilling processes, recent exploration of horizontal drilling...

Oil may be in a Slump, but the US can Stay Active

American oil isn’t what it used to be, for better or for worse. Recently, NPR’s Michel Martin sat down with famed oil businessman T. Boone Pickens, and picked his brain on the state of oil in the USA. Saying “things aren’t good” oil-wise is a bit of an understatement. For the fifth time since 1980, oil prices have been reduced by over half. In the past, this was usually corrected by Saudi Arabia over supplying oil. Most recently, the price of oil has been in free fall— it plummeted from $100 to just over a quarter of that value. At $26 a barrel, the oil producing powers that be of Saudi Arabia and Russia have left the US on it’s own. In order to fix this, oil production has been drastically cut. In just a few years, the number of oil rigs was decreased from 1,609 to 342. Pickens is convinced though, that oil will make a comeback. The problem though, is that he’s unsure of when that will be. But the industry doesn’t have to roll over completely and just wait it out. Pickens encourages an active exploration into clean energy sources. Wind and solar resources are abundant in America, he says, and the fact that so little of that energy output is used for transportation indicates a source of huge potential. This not only keeps the domestic economy humming, but will increasingly keep OPEC irrelevant. However, because we use so much oil— 94 million barrels— it’s hard for him to envision a world where that fossil fuel is suddenly pulled out from under us and wind and...